Algernon Blackwood Quotes | Quotes by Algernon Blackwood

1Not easily may an individual escape the deep slavery of the herd.

2No man can describe to another convincingly wherein lies the magic of the woman who ensnares him.

3My imagination requires a judicious rein; I am afraid to let it loose, for it carries me sometimes into appalling places beyond the stars and beneath the world.

4Ritual is the passage way of the soul into the Infinite.

5The best match in the world will not light a candle unless the wick be first suitably prepared.

6Adventures come to the adventurous, and mysterious things fall in the way of those who, with wonder and imagination, are on the watch for them; but the majority of people go past the doors that are half ajar, thinking them closed, and fail to notice the faint stirrings of the great curtain that hangs ever in the form of appearances between them and the world of causes behind.

7And if thought and emotion can persist in this way so long after the brain that sent them forth has crumpled into dust, how vitally important it must be to control their very birth in the heart, and guard them with the keenest possible restraint.

8I searched everywhere for a proof of reality, when all the while I understood quite well that the standard of reality had changed

9The dark side of life, and the horror of it, belonged to a world that lay remote from his own select little atmosphere of books and dreamings.

10To the Sabbath! To the Sabbath!' they cried. 'On to the Witches' Sabbath!" Up and down that narrow hall they danced, the women on each side of him, to the wildest measure he had ever imagined, yet which he dimly, dreadfully remembered, till the lamp on the wall flickered and went out, and they were left in total darkness. And the devil woke in his heart with a thousand vile suggestions and made him afraid.

Algernon Blackwood Quotes

11When common objects in this way be come charged with the suggestion of horror, they stimulate the imagination far more than things of unusual appearance; and these bushes, crowding huddled about us, assumed for me in the darkness a bizarre grotesquerie of appearance that lent to them somehow the aspect of purposeful and living creatures. Their very ordinariness, I felt, masked what was malignant and hostile to us.

12Time is measured by the quality and not the quanity of sensations it contains.

13No place worth knowing yields itself at sight, and those the least inviting on first view may leave the most haunting pictures upon the walls of memory.

14The wise are silent, the foolish speak, and the children are thus led astray, for wisdom is not knowledge, it is a realization of the scheme and of one's own part in it.

15It is, alas, chiefly the evil emotions that are able to leave their photographs on surrounding scenes and objects and whoever heard of a place haunted by a noble deed, or of beautiful and lovely ghosts revisiting the glimpses of the moon?

16But the wicked passions of men's hearts alone seem strong enough to leave pictures that persist the good are ever too luke-warm.